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Identifying A Leaf Bowl

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I have recently seen an eBay auction that sold a leaf bowl with the bottom marked: Hammat Originals B19. The auction stated that the bowl was Frankoma, Gracetones. I've never heard of Hammat Originals, has anyone else? Is it a Frankoma piece? Thanks in advance for the help.

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The three Gracetone leaf trays are, respectively, #125 (9-inch), #126 (12-inch) and #127 (17-inch). I do not find mold number B19 used in either Frankoma or Gracetone pieces. And I, too, have never heard of Hammat. Perhaps our enlightened Frankoma fans could shed some light on this.

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Hammat was a Tulsa, OK pottery from 1945 to 1961. They did, indeed, produce a couple of leaf trays. They are discussed in Phyllis & Tom Bess' book "Frankoma and other Oklahoma Potteries.

For reference, the Frankoma leaf mold numbers are 225, 226, and 227 for small, medium, and large.

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Thanks for your help. I mentioned this somewhere else and received this informative reply (maybe this can be useful to one of you).

Hammat Originals are not part of Frankoma, although they are discussed in a book about Oklahoma Pottery, which is mainly Frankoma.

Flora Hammat was still alive at the writing of that book, which was available on ebay at one time.

Her pottery was classified as "biomorphic" since

she used shapes found in nature. The pottery was prized by florists and flower arrangement competitors because it did not leak. During its heydey, Neiman-Marcus carried it, along with other select stores.

Flora's husband died, and she could not keep up with the influx of cheaper Asian wares that began flooding the American market, so she closed the business about the end of 1950s or the early 1960s.

But it is never to be confused with Frankoma.

I live in Oklahoma and am becoming more intested in Oklahoma pottery in general and Frankoma particularly. Looking forward to reading this forum. Thanks Again!

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I live in Oklahoma and am becoming more intested in Oklahoma pottery in general and Frankoma particularly. Looking forward to reading this forum. Thanks Again!

If you live anywhere near Sapulpa (SW of Tulsa), be sure to stop by the Frankoma Factory. There's a free museum with thousands of pieces of pottery on display and you'll get to see ALL of the new Frankoma pieces since none of the independent retailers carry more than a small selection. If you call ahead (918-224-5511), you can arrange for a tour of the factory during the hours it is open.

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I have recently seen an eBay auction that sold a leaf bowl with the bottom marked: Hammat Originals B19. The auction stated that the bowl was Frankoma, Gracetones. I've never heard of Hammat Originals, has anyone else? Is it a Frankoma piece? Thanks in advance for the help.

I have been collecting Hammat Originals for several years, beginning with a piece that belonged to my mother for 50 years. It was indeed made in Oklahoma by Flora Eckert Hammat, who studied the art in California with a famous potter whose name eludes me, but it is in the Frankoma book mentioned in one of the replies. The pottery is characterized as bio-morphic, taking its shapes from nature. I do not have any pieces that are glazed on the outside; they are all left the natural tan shades; however, the insides are beautifully glazed in 4 different shades (at least, that is all that I have) - a beautiful blue-green, pale pinkish lavender, off-white, and mocha. I have seen a piece on ebay that was glazed on the exterior with clear varnish, but I have a feeling that was added. I don't know for sure.

My mother's piece was a leaf dish, which my brothers and I always desired to use as an ash-tray, but she flatly refused forever! I believe it was given to her with a floral arrangement, and, indeed, this pottery was a favorite of florists for many years because of the impermeableness (?) of the glaze...it didn't leak! The pottery was sold at Neiman-Marcus and other fine department stores. There were also special issues for groups like Shriners. However, Flora and her daughters could not compete with the price of pottery coming in from Japan after the war, and they finally closed down the shop. At the writing of the last Frankoma book, she was still alive living with one of her daughters.

The pottery is becoming increasingly more difficult to find online. Do a google search and see if you can find any.

I hope this has helped. It is too beautiful not to be known about.

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