ccborg2

Planter/vase 55c

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I have a round green planter/vase? marked 55C Frankoma. It is approx. 5"x5". Can anyone tell me it's value and age? I did the "wet finger" test and it did not turn color. Thanks!!!

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Your #55C is a ribbed vase, either in Patina (later called Prairie Green) or Silver Sage (solid light green). Your vase was made only in 1942 and, therefore, is Ada clay. It's book value is $45-50, but I really think it would bring more on eBay, for instance, because this vase is seldom seen. Congratulations! You have a very nice piece of Frankoma.

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Well, the #55C is definitely ribbed. So perhaps you have a #55 Black-footed Ball Vase, which was produced by Frankoma from 1942 to 1967. The Ada clay version has a book value of $25-45, and later Sapulpa clay pieces are valued at $12-15. Incidentally, the "wet finger" test isn't always reliable. Ada clay is pretty recognizable; it's very light in color (beigey). When Frankoma first began using Sapulpa clay, it was very dark red in color but, as the years progressed, it lightened to pinkish beige, but it still doesn't look like Ada.

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You'll need to upload your photo to one of the free photo storage sites like Picasa (see http://picasa.google.com/ ) or SnapFish (see http://www.snapfish.com/helpstorage#quality ) or PhotoBucket (see http://photobucket.com/ ). If you google "photo storage website" or "free online photo storage" you will find lots of options. Then you'll be able to fill in the URL for your photo. It may post as a link to the photo or the actual photo -- either way, it works, and you'll find lots of other uses for this service.

Let me know if you have questions about this.

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Well, you're right. It's marked 55C. I can tell from your photo that it's definitely Ada clay, and the small, incised backstamp is one that was used during the Forties and early Fifties. If you'll post a photo of the whole vase, we should be able to tell what you have. Also, it would be helpful to know the height of the vase. This is like Frankoma forensics.

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Frankoma1.jpg

Well, you're right. It's marked 55C. I can tell from your photo that it's definitely Ada clay, and the small, incised backstamp is one that was used during the Forties and early Fifties. If you'll post a photo of the whole vase, we should be able to tell what you have. Also, it would be helpful to know the height of the vase. This is like Frankoma forensics.

http://i312.photobucket.com/albums/ll356/c...a/Frankoma1.jpg

the vase is approx 5" x 5" this is exciting!!

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My Guess is that it is a #55 black footed vase that was hand numbered 55C by accident. During this time the Frankoma mark was impressed using a metal stamp and the mold number done by hand. It looks like the 55 without the black ring on the bottom. Anyway this is a mystery piece. The production date is between 1942-1954. Nice find for a buck!

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Well, you're right. It's marked 55C. I can tell from your photo that it's definitely Ada clay, and the small, incised backstamp is one that was used during the Forties and early Fifties. If you'll post a photo of the whole vase, we should be able to tell what you have. Also, it would be helpful to know the height of the vase. This is like Frankoma forensics.

I posted the pix, but I see no response. Guess you can't identify it???

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I am in agreement with Madrushn's July 6 post. It's a mis-marked #55 vase that was not only marked with the wrong mold number, but also didn't have the black glaze added to the bottom. There aren't a lot of these Frankoma "mutations," but they come along from time to time. One thing responsible for these mystery pieces is that some Frankoma employees would occasionally make custom pieces for themselves. Sixty years later, it causes all kinds of confusion for the collectors. However, I'm reasonably certain that you have a one-of-a-kind piece.

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