lilretiree

Vintage Covered Casserole And Footed Salad Bowl

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I have a yellow footed casserole with scroll handles that measures 7 3/4 inches across bowl and 9 3/4 inches including handles. Warmen's gives the 9 3/4 inch meaurement so is it correct to assume they include the handles in their measurement?

I also found mention ( in Huxford's ) of a 1942 Holiday fiesta assortment that appears from the ad that then appeared to be the normal fiesta colors. It does mention a footed salad bowl which appears to be the casserole bottom without the lid. It doesn't give any measurements. I am wondering if this special holiday set came only in a specific color, and if the footed salad bowl was the same size as the casserole bottom which appears to be the same shape.

Thank you.

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The footed covered casserole is one of my favorite vintage pieces. Including the handles, it does indeed measure 9-3/4" across. The diameter of the bowl, itself, is 7-7/8". The lid is a little wider with a diameter of 8-1/4".

The casserole base, however, is not the same as the footed salad bowl. The casserole is much shallower (3-1/2" high from tabletop to rim) than the salad bowl (5-9/16" from tabletop to rim). It also has a smaller diameter (7-7/8" for the casserole versus 11-3/8" for the salad bowl).

You are correct in assuming that the holiday assortment would have been a selection of one or more of the six original colors. When Fiesta was introduced in 1936, it was produced in Red, Cobalt Blue, Light Green, Yellow and Ivory. Turquoise was added in 1937. No new colors were available until 1951 when Forest Green, Rose, Chartreuse and Gray were added to the line.

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Thank you so much for a very informative answer to my question. I especially appreciated your providing measurements, and what exactly was being measured. I do still seem confused however on what the reference to an 8 inch footed handled salad bowl mentioned in a 1942 McClurg's Dept Store ad on page 25 of Huxford's Fiesta Tenth Edition refers to. Switching to disc water pitchers, I have been told that one way to tell vintage from post86 ( since same molds were used ) is that the area inside opposite where the handle attaches is flat in vintage but "dimpled' or slightly "scooped out" in post 86. Is this an accurate way to tell which is which? Thanks again.

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I have the Ninth Edition of the Huxford book and, try as I might, I can find no mention of an 8-inch footed handled salad bowl. There is an individual salad bowl with a diameter of 7-5/8", but it has no handles and is not footed. The only individual bowls that had handles were the Cream Soup and the Covered Onion Soup, neither of which approached 8 inches.

The Tenth Edition must be very different from the Ninth, because I also do not find any McClurg's Dept. Store ads. Guess I'll have to get a Tenth Edition.

As for the disk water pitchers, you are correct that the molds for these pieces have not changed. So the pitchers haven't changed either. I toured the Homer Laughlin plant in Newell, WV, in 2004, and watched newly molded disk pitchers being turned out of the molds, and our guide made the point that the molds were unchanged from the 1930s.

There are several ways to distinguish between Vintage and Post-86 Fiesta, but I think the best one is the glazed/unglazed "foot" test. My Ninth Edition Huxford says:

If you can't compare colors and sizes when shopping, remember that saggar pin marks and a fully glazed foot always indicate old Fiesta. (Homer Laughlin just doesn't use saggar pins anymore.) To clarify, old Fiesta plates, for instance, always had a fully glazed foot (the part of the plate that touched the table), and in the firing process, the old plates had to be propped up on three little pins called saggars so they would not fuse themselves to the kiln shelf when the glaze melted during firing. This left the three little scars (or saggar pin marks) on the underside of the plates and under the rims of the vintage bowls we are all so familiar with. New Fiesta pieces always have a dry or wiped foot; there is no glaze covering the area that touches the table. Old tripod candlesticks almost always had a fully glazed foot and three saggar pin scars on the underside; new ones will always have a dry, wiped foot. Even compared to those items which in the vintage line had a wiped foot (the bulb candlesticks, tall and bud vases,
pitchers
, and sauce boats, for instance), the new ones display a raw clay that has a bit more shine and is brighter white than the clay used to make the old line. . . .

Thanks for writing. I enjoy going down all the rabbit trails to find answers -- although the rabbit trails don't always lead me to an answer.

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