Connie Brazee

Collectable Plate

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Hi, I,m new to this discussion stuff, so hope I am doing this correctly. I have recently acquired a signed and dated Frankoma plate. It is titled "The Phoenix", and is signed by Joniece Frank, and dated 1985. I'm pretty sure this is a Sapulpa Clay Plate. The plate is a vivid orange, and the front features a raised rendition of the Phoenix Bird rising out of the ashes. The back is marked "1st EDITION", and also has raised letters, describing the story of the Phoenix Bird,. As I mentioned, it is signed by Joniece Frank. also bearing a copyright next to her initials, 1985 and "FRANKOMA PH".

I also have what appears to be a Frankoma Planter, the exterior being the same vivid orange glaze as the plate, and the interior being a lusterous, chocolate brown glaze. The planter is 12 & 1/2 in. long, 4 in. high, and 3&1/2 in. deep. The walls of this piece have two vertical indented lines, seperating the piece into 3 sections. The corners are somewhat rounded and bear teardrop shape moulding, desending down to the base. This piece is probably Sapulpa Clay, and the bottom is engraved "FRANKOMA", w/ the number 15 underneath.

Thanks for any information on the value of these pieces!

Connie Brazee

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Your Phoenix plate was designed by Joniece Frank to commemorate a piece of Frankoma history. On September 26, 1983, a fire destroyed 90 percent of the Frankoma plant and its contents. By July of 1984, however, Frankoma opened the doors to its new plant. The inscription reads "The phoenix was a mythical bird who lived 500 years. At the end of its life cycle, it sacrificed itself on an altar of fire only to be born again rising from the ashes more beautiful than before." The Phyllis and Tom Bess book, Frankoma and Other Oklahoma Potteries, puts a value of $35-45 on this piece.

I found your #15 planter listed in Gary Schaum's Collector's Guide to Frankoma Pottery. Although it is not pictured in the book, the piece is described as a 12-inch oblong planter in production from 1957 to 1977, which would make it Sapulpa clay, with a value of $15-20.

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