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Hello from UK,

I have a chartreuse gravy boat of my Mums which I would like to sell on ebay.

Doing research however I find that this colour was produced in 1951-59 and again in1997-99.

My problemis not knowing how to tell which shade of chartreuse I have.

I want to list it correctly with an accurate description. Any ideas anybody please? regrads Jane :banana:

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You just happen to have a piece that can be tricky to identify, especially if you have no other Fiestaware to compare it with. Here, however, are some clues:

1. Post-86 chartreuse is generally acknowledged to be a brighter shade than the vintage chartreuse.

2. The foot of the vintage pieces was always glazed (the foot is the bottom of the piece that actually comes into contact with the table) WITH A FEW EXCEPTIONS. Unfortunately, the gravy boat was one of those exceptions. However, one of my Fiesta books says: ". . . the new ones display a raw clay that has a bit more shine and is brighter white than the clay used to make the old line."

3. Another identifier in the book: ". . . old items were dipped in the glaze by hand, whereas the glaze on the new Fiesta is sprayed on. It is often possible to see the speckled spray pattern on new items, especially under the handles of the pitchers, etc., or under the foot of items like the candle holders, sauce boats, or bud vases."

4. Because it is made of vitrified china, as opposed to semi-vitrified, the Post-86 Fiesta is denser, a little heavier and ever so slightly smaller than vintage. Vitrified china must be fired at a higher temperature which makes it shrink more.

5. The Homer Laughlin Company started adding a raised "H" to the underside of Post-86 pieces that used the old molds, but I don't think they started doing it until Pearl Gray was introduced in 1999. Pearl Gray was produced just after Chartreuse. I am not absolutely certain of that and, if your gravy boat has a raised "H" on its underside, you can be sure it's Post-86 and not vintage.

I am sorry I can't come up with an absolute way for you to determine the age of your piece. If I had it in my hands where I would be able to compare it with the rest of my Fiesta, I could tell you in a flash. The book I referred to is Collector's Encyclopedia of Fiesta, Ninth Edition by Bob & Sharon Huxford.

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You just happen to have a piece that can be tricky to identify, especially if you have no other Fiestaware to compare it with. Here, however, are some clues:

1. Post-86 chartreuse is generally acknowledged to be a brighter shade than the vintage chartreuse.

2. The foot of the vintage pieces was always glazed (the foot is the bottom of the piece that actually comes into contact with the table) WITH A FEW EXCEPTIONS. Unfortunately, the gravy boat was one of those exceptions. However, one of my Fiesta books says: ". . . the new ones display a raw clay that has a bit more shine and is brighter white than the clay used to make the old line."

3. Another identifier in the book: ". . . old items were dipped in the glaze by hand, whereas the glaze on the new Fiesta is sprayed on. It is often possible to see the speckled spray pattern on new items, especially under the handles of the pitchers, etc., or under the foot of items like the candle holders, sauce boats, or bud vases."

4. Because it is made of vitrified china, as opposed to semi-vitrified, the Post-86 Fiesta is denser, a little heavier and ever so slightly smaller than vintage. Vitrified china must be fired at a higher temperature which makes it shrink more.

5. The Homer Laughlin Company started adding a raised "H" to the underside of Post-86 pieces that used the old molds, but I don't think they started doing it until Pearl Gray was introduced in 1999. Pearl Gray was produced just after Chartreuse. I am not absolutely certain of that and, if your gravy boat has a raised "H" on its underside, you can be sure it's Post-86 and not vintage.

I am sorry I can't come up with an absolute way for you to determine the age of your piece. If I had it in my hands where I would be able to compare it with the rest of my Fiesta, I could tell you in a flash. The book I referred to is Collector's Encyclopedia of Fiesta, Ninth Edition by Bob & Sharon Huxford.

Thank you so much plm555, - the amount of knowledge you have is astounding.

I don't have the "H" on the base - but have no other pieces to compare for weight and colour.

As the glaze is not splattered as you mention - I am presuming the piece is old but will not describe it as such

Thank you once again for being so helpful.

I have now become fascinated with Fiestaware! cheers Jane :D

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