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Shaianin

Leslie's Fried Chicken

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Ok, people, here it is....

have a bowl with flour, we have seasoned it a bit with white pepper and a bit of salt, to taste....

Dip your chicken peices in the flour and then dip in the following mixture and back into the flour:

1 Cup powdered whey (Baking type- sweet powdered whey)This is not readily available in grocery stores, we found in online at www.berryfarms.com

3/4 cup powdered non/fat dry milk

1/4 cup salt (was a little salty- I might reduce this slightly next time)Try using just half of this or less, depending on how much you put in the flour.

2/3 cup water (I had to guess on the amount of water)

This mixture needs to be thin, the combination gives it the batter texture.

Dust chicken in flour, then into wet mix, then back into flour, shake off excess, cook in oil at 350 degrees for 12 minutes.

Evidently the whey is what give it the flavor. We have also used buttermilk powder in place of the dry milk and whey and it comes pretty close! This works best in a deep fryer, rather than pan frying.

The crust is amazing, holds up well a couple of days in the fridge.! :lol:

If you want the best flavor, use the buttermilk powder instead of the nonfat dry milk. Resist the urge to double dip, one round of the flour-wet-flour is sufficent and only dip what you are going to fry in one batch...

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If you want the best flavor, use the buttermilk powder instead of the nonfat dry milk. Resist the urge to double dip, one round of the flour-wet-flour is sufficent and only dip what you are going to fry in one batch...

Thanks for the information you have provided. We have tried the recipe as outlined, and though it is close, we are still trying to "capture" that unique flavor of Youngblood's. And, we are also wondering is Leslie's might have used a slight variant of the Youngblood's if the recipe posted is more like the one they used. Never dined there. You mentioned you have the "industrial" portions recipe and were scaling it down. Would you mind sharing that? Sometimes cutting down recipes from a batch proportionately result in different outcomes. I would like to play with it and share anything different with you. I'm a certified chef (CIA--not in the biz now; too many staffing issues in Texas!) Also, my partner knows someone who worked at the place in Oak Cliff (did business with his dad's bank)who told him something that was more like that buttermilk soak, lots of salt thing. Look forward to hearing from you.

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Thanks for the information you have provided. We have tried the recipe as outlined, and though it is close, we are still trying to "capture" that unique flavor of Youngblood's. And, we are also wondering if Leslie's might have used a slight variant of the Youngblood's if the recipe posted is more like the one they used. Never dined there. You mentioned you have the "industrial" portions recipe and were scaling it down. Would you mind sharing that? Sometimes cutting down recipes from a batch proportionately result in different outcomes. I would like to play with it and share anything different with you. I'm a certified chef (CIA--not in the biz now; too many staffing issues in Texas!) Also, my partner knows someone who worked at the place in Oak Cliff (did business with his dad's bank)who told him something that was more like that buttermilk soak, lots of salt thing. Look forward to hearing from you.

One other thing I forgot to mention. Some other post said they used cottonseed oil for frying. We used this also in trying the recipe. It was very common to use this oil during the time Youngblood's etal were in business. Did you use this or some other oil, or maybe should ask which one worked best for you? Thanks very much!

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Here's the text of the email that lists the original proportions and gives some other information that a man who used to be a manager at youngblood's. See what you can do with it!! Let us know how you do?

:lol:

You are not going to believe the original proportions. They used 7 lbs. salt, 2 lbs. whey, 1 lb dry milk. I asked him how they could use so much salt and have it taste good. He said it was mixed in a lot of water in proportion to the salt but that it still tasted very salty. Later they reduced the salt but he didn't know exactly how much. He said to add salt to taste which he said would be somewhere around 2 cups whey, 1 cup dry milk, and 1/4 cup of salt. It still tasted too salty to me and their measurements were by weight not by volume. So the only consistent thing we have is the 2 lbs whey and 1 lb dry milk, then salt to taste. This is all for the liquid part. I asked him if they seasoned the flour at all and he said they did not while he was with Youngblood's. When he moved to Denver and started the Drumstick chicken restaurants they did season the flour some but I don't know with what yet.

He said when he makes fried chicken at home he puts white pepper and salt in the flour, then mixes 1 egg and 1 Tbsp. water for the wet mix. He dips the chicken in the flour, shakes off excess, dips it into the egg/water mix, and back into the flour, shakes off excess, then into 350 oil.

The other thing I want to try is to find cottonseed oil. They used it at Youngblood's and Leslie's because it was the cheapest and he said it lasted longer than the other oils. He said it didn't make any difference in taste but I can tell a difference between peanut oil, vegetable oil, and Crisco. So I wonder if the cottonseed added anything to the flavor.

Another thought I had was that he was at Youngblood's in the 50s. I would imagine the recipe changed with time so they may have been seasoning things more in the 60s. I know Leslie's started using buttermilk in their wet mix.

Lot's of fried chicken to experiment with!! It may take us all but at least we have some direction. I really like the taste of the sweet whey in the mix. It added a flavor that is very nice.

James

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Here's the text of the email that lists the original proportions and gives some other information that a man who used to be a manager at youngblood's. See what you can do with it!! Let us know how you do?

:lol:

You are not going to believe the original proportions. They used 7 lbs. salt, 2 lbs. whey, 1 lb dry milk. I asked him how they could use so much salt and have it taste good. He said it was mixed in a lot of water in proportion to the salt but that it still tasted very salty. Later they reduced the salt but he didn't know exactly how much. He said to add salt to taste which he said would be somewhere around 2 cups whey, 1 cup dry milk, and 1/4 cup of salt. It still tasted too salty to me and their measurements were by weight not by volume. So the only consistent thing we have is the 2 lbs whey and 1 lb dry milk, then salt to taste. This is all for the liquid part. I asked him if they seasoned the flour at all and he said they did not while he was with Youngblood's. When he moved to Denver and started the Drumstick chicken restaurants they did season the flour some but I don't know with what yet.

He said when he makes fried chicken at home he puts white pepper and salt in the flour, then mixes 1 egg and 1 Tbsp. water for the wet mix. He dips the chicken in the flour, shakes off excess, dips it into the egg/water mix, and back into the flour, shakes off excess, then into 350 oil.

The other thing I want to try is to find cottonseed oil. They used it at Youngblood's and Leslie's because it was the cheapest and he said it lasted longer than the other oils. He said it didn't make any difference in taste but I can tell a difference between peanut oil, vegetable oil, and Crisco. So I wonder if the cottonseed added anything to the flavor.

Another thought I had was that he was at Youngblood's in the 50s. I would imagine the recipe changed with time so they may have been seasoning things more in the 60s. I know Leslie's started using buttermilk in their wet mix.

Lot's of fried chicken to experiment with!! It may take us all but at least we have some direction. I really like the taste of the sweet whey in the mix. It added a flavor that is very nice.

James

Thanks again! This gives something else to work with. In the first attempt we did use cottonseed oil which we bought at our local super market--HEB. It's under the name "Cajun Injector Premium Frying Oil." It's 100% pure. Interestingly, Zapp's regular potato chips lists cottonseed and other oils in which the chips may be cooked. The initial flavor, before you really taste the chip, is virtually the same as Youngblood's. We deduced the cotton seed oil may be the reason for the flavor since it is not always present in the chips, and assumed in those cases other oils may have been used. And, in frying, we've used all the other oils and not had the flavor. That's what generated the interest in the first place and started the search for any recipe. I remember the stores at Fair Park and Oak Cliff in the late 50's and 60's and don't remember the flavor ever changing so I assumed they continued to use the same recipe. But, it's been a long time. We'll keep you posted.

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Fascinating thread. We lived on the coast below Houston but every time we traveled we looked for a Leslie's; I remember that one in Waco and we stopped several times - will have to look for it next time I'm up that way.

For what it's worth, cottonseed oil was very widely used back then, before soybean oil. Wesson Oil was cottonseed oil, is now soy. Crisco was made from cottonseed oil, now, last time I looked, there's still some cottonseed oil in it but soybean oil is listed first. Other shortenings like Spry also were cottonseed oil. I won't be surprised if it makes a difference in flavor.

I've bought it in Houston under the Louana brand but it's been a few years since I even looked for - I use canola or olive oil for everything now.

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Oh my goodness, I can't believe it. I can taste that Leslies fried chicken now. And while you're looking for that recipe, would you

also look for the Elite Cafe's salad dressing. And I wonder if Mrs. Keatons bakery left the recipe for cream puffs to someone. They

were the best.

The recipe book for Mrs. Keatons Bakery was advertised for sale in the Waco newspaper back in the 80's. I have kicked myself many times for not responding to the ad. Mrs. Keaton, the daughter-in-law of the original Mrs. Keaton, passed away in 2010 I believe. The cream puffs were not really cream puffs in the traditional sence as I have found out while searching for a recipe. More like what you would find in a doughnut shop but very light and tasty. Similar cream puffs showed up at a Czech bakery on Waco Drive back in the 90's but the maple flavored icing was oily, not light and fluffy like the original. After that bakery closed Jack and Jill Dounuts started serving a similar icing on their products that was closer to the original. Since it changed hands they do not do that anymore. I have not lived in Waco since 1995 but was born there and well remember birthday cakes and visits to Mrs. Keaton's for the cream puffs as a special treat when I was a child. I sure wish I had gone more often as an adult.

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