gkifer

Frankoma Cornucopia

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I just recently purchased this Frankoma cornucopia and was told it is the Redbud glaze and made from Ada clay. I am wondering approximately what year it may have been made and what its worth might be? Has anyone seen this one before?

http://i1131.photobucket.com/albums/m560/nazneen6/DSC00365.jpg

http://i1131.photobucket.com/albums/m560/nazneen6/DSC00363.jpg

http://i1131.photobucket.com/albums/m560/nazneen6/DSC00361.jpg

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It's definitely Redbud and definitely Ada clay. From the backstamp, I can tell it's from the 1940s. I'm away from my reference books at the moment, so I'll get back to you with more particulars.

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It's mold #57 and should be about 10". There is a little confusion because Frankoma released an entirely different #57 and #57A in the 60's through 80's (these were 7" and 6", respectively).

Your #57 was produced from around 1942 to 1960. Book value in Ada clay is $45-50. With Redbud glaze, though, I'd probably double that (I sold one with a chip for $90, IIRC).

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It's mold #57 and should be about 10". There is a little confusion because Frankoma released an entirely different #57 and #57A in the 60's through 80's (these were 7" and 6", respectively).

Your #57 was produced from around 1942 to 1960. Book value in Ada clay is $45-50. With Redbud glaze, though, I'd probably double that (I sold one with a chip for $90, IIRC).

Yes, this is 10" wide and 4.5" at it's tallest point. Do I understand correctly that Ada clay was no longer used after 1954-55?

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Yes, this is 10" wide and 4.5" at it's tallest point. Do I understand correctly that Ada clay was no longer used after 1954-55?

That's the generally accepted time frame.

My experience suggests that the transition was broader than widely stated. One expert claims strong evidence that Frankoma was experimenting with Sapulpa clay as early as around 1948. And pieces around 1953-55 show a different, transitional color scheme - not like either Ada or Sapulpa. Either the Ada clay that they were mining while the mine was running out was a different color or they were using a combination of clay at the time. I never asked Joniece Frank and probably should - she would know for sure.

In any event, there was almost certainly no Ada clay after 1955.

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