twk1964

Southeast Texas Melting Pot!

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I grew up and live in Southeast Texas and our food reflects not only the Texas and Mexican influence, but also the Cajun and Southern influence. I was wondering if this counts as "Texas" cooking or should the traditional Cajun and Southern recipes be included and discussed on other forums?

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Absolutely! Cajun and Southern cooking are vital parts of Texas Cooking and www.texascooking.com. Just check our Grandma's Cookbook, and you'll find loads of southern recipes (I was practically raised on black-eyed peas and cornbread) and Cajun recipes, too.

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I grew up and live in Southeast Texas and our food reflects not only the Texas and Mexican influence, but also the Cajun and Southern influence. I was wondering if this counts as "Texas" cooking or should the traditional Cajun and Southern recipes be included and discussed on other forums?

It sure does count as Texas cooking! It's in Texas, ain't it? B)

Southern and Cajun cooking was an important part of what my family cooked as I was growing up, and these traditions have stayed with me. Fried chicken, collard greens, and black-eyed peas with corn bread! Yum! Or a big pot of seafood gumbo! Double yum!

One thing that gets me whenever Texas BBQ is discussed by non-Texans -- they seem to think the only thing we barbecue is beef. Heck, I was raised on barbecued ribs and sausages as well as brisket, so I always like to point out to folks that in South Central and South East Texas, the barbecuing traditions aren't so plain as they may be, say, in Lubbock or Amarillo.

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One thing that gets me whenever Texas BBQ is discussed by non-Texans -- they seem to think the only thing we barbecue is beef. Heck, I was raised on barbecued ribs and sausages as well as brisket, so I always like to point out to folks that in South Central and South East Texas, the barbecuing traditions aren't so plain as they may be, say, in Lubbock or Amarillo.

Agreed. Even sophisticated (?) food writers who've been to the barbecue palaces in Central Texas will write that Texas is all about beef. There seems to be a need to see Texas in very simplistic terms. Let's face it, we're just too much for a lot of people!

Same thing goes for the Cajun influence, too. Well, even most Texans don't seem to give a second thought to sausages.

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