Guest Adam

How Come Eggs/fish Still Stick?

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Guest Adam

Hi, I am new to cast iron, and just got a skillet. I seasoned it according to about 4 different web sites in the oven. When I cook eggs or seasoned fish, some of the food still sticks to the bottom :( Do I heat the pan before adding food? Do I add oil? Is the pan too hot for cooking? Please help!

Adam

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From my experience the cast iron must be hot before putting food in.

I always add a small amount of cooking oil when I put the CI on the stove. When is moves around as if it were water, I figure it is hot enough. I also keep moving the meat about the pan until it gets that first hint of a glaze (or whatever it is really called) that keeps it from sticking.

A properly seasoned CI pot or skillet will rarely need anthing more than being wiped out after use.

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Yes, you should always preheat cast-iron and add a small bit of oil or better yet (in my opinion) lard, beef tallow, or bacon grease to prevent sticking. It's also a good indicator of when the pan is hot... if the grease is all liquid, it's ready. Plus you get the tasty flavors only natural fats provide.

I wipe my cast iron skillets, oil them, then store them in or under the oven. Luckily I use mine often enough to prevent the oil from going rancid.

As I understand it, hydrogenated lard doesn't go rancid at room temperature for a VERY long time. No small wonder it was used on cast iron for ages. So maybe this is a better option if you don't use your CI so much, I'm really an expert in that field.

On a healthier note, the lard you buy in the super market is usually a blend of hydrogenated and non-hydrogenated lards. Fully hydrogenated oils/fats contain NO Trans-Fat, unlike shortening which is partially hydrogenated. So, although you get a tick on your saturated fat meter, you don't gain any of the nasty effects of an artificial fat that the body isn't quite sure what to do with. :titanic:

I've found that PAM (original canola) works nicely for keeping your cast-iron seasoned between meals. Excess wipes off easily, it coats evenly, stays on the pan, and the alcohol gives me that comfy sanitized feeling. ;) PAM (The name-brand product) does not contain silicon oils, contrary to many urban legends, and it is my understanding it never did. However, most store brands and many competing brands contain some sort of silicon oil, possibly to replace the Soya Lecithin. Don't use PAM if you're allergic to peanuts.

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